How To: See through people's clothes with a video camera

This video tutorial teaches you how to see through clothes using a blank roll of film and any video camera that has night vision. You won't see people completely naked, but you can see undergarments and the "shape" beneath...If your imagination just isn't cutting it anymore, check out this how-to video and start getting a peak at people in a slightly less clothed state.

How To: Convert a car LCD screen into a portable video monitor

When you're shooting a film, being able to see what you're shooting well and adjust on the fly is crucial. With the tiny screen on most cheap cameras, this is kind of a crapshoot. This video will show you a cheap way to solve this problem: converting a car $50 car LCD screen into a portable video monitor that you can attach to your camera and run off of batteries on set. The screen is probably bigger and nicer than the one on your camera, and will improve the quality and productivity of your ...

How To: Modify a Glidecam with a Steadicam arm and vest

The lady shows how to make the steadicam arm to work with glidecam stabilizer. The steadicam arm is made such as only a steadicam can be fitted on that. The video describes how to make the usable for glidecam with three simple tools ,a 10 ounce hammer ,a long nose player and a flathead screwdriver. First take out the circular clip with which the post is secured with the screwdriver unscrew and pull the post out .Using the hammer straighten the post .The post will have a scratch but the straig...

Hack Ikea: $15 Camera Dolly

Ikea Hacker features a nice Ikea mod: Romain turns the Ivar side unit into a camera dolly. "A few days ago, I found out that the Ivar 'wooden ladder' was perfect to use it as rails for my cinema dolly! I can now make some nice sequence shots with this 18€ accessory from Ikea."

How To: Frame and compose a shot for film

What makes a good movie good is that it is both aesthetically pleasing and has an interesting point/plot. This video runs you through how to make it visually effective, stressing how you frame and compose a shot. While the Rule of Thirds is forever a great way to make shots interesting, there are other ways you can set up a shot.

How To: Shoot sunrise or sunsets on video

It's very hard to capture a sunrise on camera. Yes, you can get a general feeling from a single shot: the hazy, blue-orange rays of light peeking through the clouds in a sunrise or the crimson red streaks of sun dappling darkening skies in a sunset. But to truly capture a sunset or a sunrise, you have to experience them.

How To: Get Great Bokeh for Videos and Photos Using Christmas Lights

So what is Bokeh? Well, the word comes from the Japanese term "boke" (bo-keh) which means fuzziness. Bokeh describes the character of the blur in an image, but is often used specifically to refer to points of light rendered as fuzzy circles. These "circles of confusion" come from points of light not being perfectly focused. You know when you're taking a picture of your friend at night, and the lights in the background go fuzzy? That's it! Having a beautifully blurred background can help focus...

How To: Film Using DSLR at Low Light

Filming in low light is not easy, its tricky and challenging, but if you know the proper ways to set your DSLR camera even if you have the most ordinary lenses you can still capture great videos with less noise. So here are some settings and samples in Filming with your DSLR in Low light.

News: Tilt-Shift, Time-Lapse Video from Camera Phone Transforms the Real World into a Mini Toyland

This colorful image may look like a miniature set of model cars, foam buildings and painted grass, but it's nothing of the sort. It's a still photo from a time-lapse video that Stu Kennedy shot in his hometown of Lincoln, England. But it's not your ordinary time-lapse. Kennedy used his trusty new Samsung Galaxy S2 and its 8-megapixel camera to capture the video in high-definition (1080p). And that's not all. He also used a post-editing technique called tilt-shift, which transforms the normal ...

Explosive POV: Mini Spy Cam Mounted on Firework

The 4th of July brings out the inner-pyro-hypnotized child in many of us. And while WonderHowTo has plenty of tutorials for using/creating firecrackers , fireworks, and general explosives—for responsible 18+ upstanding citizens only, of course!—some of us prefer to enjoy the fiery goodness from the safety of our computer screens.

News: Firing Tank Caught at 18,000 FPS Looks Just As Awesome As It Sounds

It's like the H-bomb. In slo-mo, it's stunning. In real life, it's terrifying. The footage below was uploaded by YouTube user NielsBorg, unfortunately lacking in description, but offers the following information via headline: "T90 shot taken by Photron camera at 18000 fps". The T-90 is a brute of a tank, a third-generation battle vehicle used by the Russian Ground Forces and Naval Infantry. The tank contains an autoloader which can carry 22 ready-to-fire rounds, loadable and ready to go in 5-...

News: Shoecam Takes Wingsuit Flying to New Heights

For most thrill-seekers, skydiving alone is an adrenaline rush worth experiencing only once, but for the death-defying, elite skydiver, the wingsuit is the next step in daring midair adventures. But thankfully, we people who like our feet planted on the ground can enjoy the thrill ride via our flatscreens, due to some fearless cinematography from the daredevils themselves. And though there is no shortage of awesome skydiving footage on the web, there is a shortage of camera angles, with most ...

Breakfast Interrupted: Tangled Food Captured Midair at 1,000 FPS

They're not the fastest in the world, but Vision Research's line of Phantom high-speed cameras produce some of the best slow motion effects on the web. They can turn violent punches into a chaotic scene of distorted skin and repulsive sweat, or make a night's stay in a hotel room more exciting. Now breakfast gets the Phantom treatment in Breakfast Interrupted, where America's favorite meal gets captured in midair at 1,000 frames per second.

Prev Page