How To: Install the Nikon mount on a RED ONE camera

Check out this instructional cinematography video to learn how to install the Nikon mount on a professional RED ONE camera. This is not an official method, but simply one way to do it until RED officially releases its own how to video. If you don't have steady hands, you may want to take more precautions into covering the sensor while you work. This video tutorial does an excellent job of guiding you step by step along the way to better utilize your RED ONE camera.

How To: See through people's clothes with a video camera

This video tutorial teaches you how to see through clothes using a blank roll of film and any video camera that has night vision. You won't see people completely naked, but you can see undergarments and the "shape" beneath...If your imagination just isn't cutting it anymore, check out this how-to video and start getting a peak at people in a slightly less clothed state.

How To: Make a cheap Dutch Roll camera effect

Maybe you've never heard of the Dutch Roll camera effect, but you've seen it in movies whenever a character is delirious and the camera starts spinning crazily end over need. In this tutorial you'll learn how to set up a cheap version of the effect with a plain old hand drill. Now you can give your audiences vertigo just like the pros do!

Explosive POV: Mini Spy Cam Mounted on Firework

The 4th of July brings out the inner-pyro-hypnotized child in many of us. And while WonderHowTo has plenty of tutorials for using/creating firecrackers , fireworks, and general explosives—for responsible 18+ upstanding citizens only, of course!—some of us prefer to enjoy the fiery goodness from the safety of our computer screens.

How To: Build a homemade steadycam camera stabilizer

In this video tutorial, you'll see how you can build a homemade steadycam camera stabilizer for under fifty bucks. This is more specifically how to build the JayCam MkII Merlin-type camera stabilizer from Jay Shaffer. He demonstrates how to use inexpensive parts to make a versatile stabilizer for camcorders like the Canon HV30. This is a great steadycam addition for anyone in need of DIY cinematography tricks, because real steadycams can be costly.

How To: Convert a car LCD screen into a portable video monitor

When you're shooting a film, being able to see what you're shooting well and adjust on the fly is crucial. With the tiny screen on most cheap cameras, this is kind of a crapshoot. This video will show you a cheap way to solve this problem: converting a car $50 car LCD screen into a portable video monitor that you can attach to your camera and run off of batteries on set. The screen is probably bigger and nicer than the one on your camera, and will improve the quality and productivity of your ...

News: Shoecam Takes Wingsuit Flying to New Heights

For most thrill-seekers, skydiving alone is an adrenaline rush worth experiencing only once, but for the death-defying, elite skydiver, the wingsuit is the next step in daring midair adventures. But thankfully, we people who like our feet planted on the ground can enjoy the thrill ride via our flatscreens, due to some fearless cinematography from the daredevils themselves. And though there is no shortage of awesome skydiving footage on the web, there is a shortage of camera angles, with most ...

How To: Set the aperture and shutter speed on the HV20

This is a cinematography tutorial video that demonstrates how to control the aperture and shutter speed on the HV20 high definition camcorder. This is the PAL version, so it's basically the same except the NTSC version would have different shutter speeds. You will also need a miniSD card in your camera for this technique to work. Learn how to set the aperture and shutter speed on the HV20 high definition camcorder with this instructional cinematography video.

How To: Build your own ten foot long camera dolly track

Need some smooth pan shots for your indie film? How about a cool dolly zoom effect? Well, you don't need to be a professional filmmaker to use such a device, but you do need the money for the gear. But—if you can work your way around the workshop, you can probably build your own camera dolly and track just fine. And for under $100! This video shows you how to build your own DIY dolly and dolly track, and all you need are the parts listed below. Then you just need to learn the art of the dolly...

How To: Use an external monitor with a camcorder

In this video from lunawebs we learn how to use an external monitor with a camcorder. The best way is to use an HDTV and use your HDMI output on the TV. The sound can also come through the monitor if you have a headphone port on the monitor. If you want to go outdoors, it will be more of a challenge. If you do not have an HDMI out on your camera, there is a component you can use. Composite AV outs are cheaper when it comes to monitors and camcorders. If you have a composite monitor, assign th...

How To: Create a camera tripod with a rubber band

There are a lot of ways to keep your camera from shaking. Most of these involve expensive devices known as tripods. If you're super stingy and don't want to spring from a tripod, this video tutorial will show you how to make one using only a rubber band. The method shown in this cinematography video is small, simple, and very effective for keeping your camera from shaking.

News: DIY RC Helicopter Rig Captures Amazing Canon 7D/5D Aerial Footage

One of the greatest innovations in the DSLR revolution is not only being able to execute shots you never dreamed possible, but you'll find it's affordable, too. I can't think of a better example than this remote controlled DSLR helicopter rig, designed specifically for the Canon 7D and 5D. Advertised as "high definition, low altitude photography and videography," HeliVideo's founder, Eric Austin combines his experience and love of remote controlled helicopters with his knowledge as a videogra...

How To: Make your own camera dolly

If you’re into cinematography try creating your own dolly camera platform to get those seamless tracking shots. This is a fun project that will allow you to take your film to the next level, or at least get the shot you want.

How To: Use the Canon XH-A1 Digital Camcorder

Do you own the Canon XH-A1 Digital Camcorder? If so, you might want to check out this lengthy video tutorial that shows you the ins and outs to the Canon XH-A1, the High Definition digital camera for the professional and serious non-pro alike. Learn how to make manual adjustments to fine-tune your video by adjusting the Shutter Priority Mode (Tv), the Manual and Auto Focus, the Exposure, and much, much more. This shows a bunch of tips and tricks for you cameramen.

How To: Make your own affordable underwater camera rig

Want to film underwater, but can't afford the expensive professional camera rig? This tutorial shows you how you can construct your own functional underwater camera rig for about sixty dollars. You will need: small ankle weights, threaded seal tape, waterproof sealant, Velcro, a rubber washer, a sheet of plexiglass, PVC pieces, metal ring clamps, hot glue and a dremel.

How To: Make a cheap DIY camera slider for your film

Film and television cinematographers love sliding camera shots, especially since ER made them a standard device for television dramas. A professional sliding camera setup is expensive though. Why not make one yourself? This video will show you how to turn $20 into a high-quality filmmaking tool that you can use to give your films some very professional-looking shots. Now get out there and follow that gurney with the camera!

How To: Frame and compose a shot for film

What makes a good movie good is that it is both aesthetically pleasing and has an interesting point/plot. This video runs you through how to make it visually effective, stressing how you frame and compose a shot. While the Rule of Thirds is forever a great way to make shots interesting, there are other ways you can set up a shot.

How To: Shoot low angle moving shots from ground level with a video camera

Low angle shots are a great way to evoke a sense of panic in movies, but if you're trying to get good quality shots from ground level with just your hands, then it's not going to work. The video footage will be all shaky, unless that's another look you're wanting to achieve in your film. If you want steady, fast-tracking low angle footage, then Ritwika has a great trick on taking those ground level moving camera shots. You'll need a monopod, water bottle (with water), 2 rubber bands and your ...

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