How To: See through people's clothes with a video camera

This video tutorial teaches you how to see through clothes using a blank roll of film and any video camera that has night vision. You won't see people completely naked, but you can see undergarments and the "shape" beneath...If your imagination just isn't cutting it anymore, check out this how-to video and start getting a peak at people in a slightly less clothed state.

How To: Shoot sunrise or sunsets on video

It's very hard to capture a sunrise on camera. Yes, you can get a general feeling from a single shot: the hazy, blue-orange rays of light peeking through the clouds in a sunrise or the crimson red streaks of sun dappling darkening skies in a sunset. But to truly capture a sunset or a sunrise, you have to experience them.

How To: Frame and compose a shot for film

What makes a good movie good is that it is both aesthetically pleasing and has an interesting point/plot. This video runs you through how to make it visually effective, stressing how you frame and compose a shot. While the Rule of Thirds is forever a great way to make shots interesting, there are other ways you can set up a shot.

How To: Make a cheap Dutch Roll camera effect

Maybe you've never heard of the Dutch Roll camera effect, but you've seen it in movies whenever a character is delirious and the camera starts spinning crazily end over need. In this tutorial you'll learn how to set up a cheap version of the effect with a plain old hand drill. Now you can give your audiences vertigo just like the pros do!

How To: Make a bicycle camera mount

Shoot an action-packed close up, or film while you're biking around. All you need to do is build a simple bicycle camera mount. You'll need a tripod mount, PVC pipe, pliers, bungee cord, a U bolt and a bike. Watch this video cinematography tutorial and learn how to build a bicycle camera mount.

How To: Shoot a dolly zoom shot

The dolly zoom shot is also known as the Vertigo Effect in filming. It's that dizzying, slightly unstable camera effect you see in shows like "Glee" and sometimes "The Office." It creates audience confusion, thus forcing them to keep watching in interest.

How To: Make your own affordable underwater camera rig

Want to film underwater, but can't afford the expensive professional camera rig? This tutorial shows you how you can construct your own functional underwater camera rig for about sixty dollars. You will need: small ankle weights, threaded seal tape, waterproof sealant, Velcro, a rubber washer, a sheet of plexiglass, PVC pieces, metal ring clamps, hot glue and a dremel.

Explosive POV: Mini Spy Cam Mounted on Firework

The 4th of July brings out the inner-pyro-hypnotized child in many of us. And while WonderHowTo has plenty of tutorials for using/creating firecrackers , fireworks, and general explosives—for responsible 18+ upstanding citizens only, of course!—some of us prefer to enjoy the fiery goodness from the safety of our computer screens.

How To: Build a DIY wooden camera dolly with PVC railing system

If you need a dolly for your movie masterpiece, you don't need to go with a professional dolly system. You can save that money for your expensive actors and actresses by building your own DIY camera dolly on the cheap. You'll need some nuts and bolts, PVC pipes, scrap wood, drill bits and a drill, inline wheels and a hammer. This homemade camera dolly will cost you around 65 bucks.

News: Shoecam Takes Wingsuit Flying to New Heights

For most thrill-seekers, skydiving alone is an adrenaline rush worth experiencing only once, but for the death-defying, elite skydiver, the wingsuit is the next step in daring midair adventures. But thankfully, we people who like our feet planted on the ground can enjoy the thrill ride via our flatscreens, due to some fearless cinematography from the daredevils themselves. And though there is no shortage of awesome skydiving footage on the web, there is a shortage of camera angles, with most ...

How To: Build a cheap steady cam rig or fig rig

Steady cam rigs allow you to film really great smooth footage, but they cost about $300. If you're too lazy to make one yourself that is! This video will show you how to make a cheap substitute called a fig rig using $30 dollars worth of materials. Now you can finally push beyond handheld to the world of professional-looking video.

How To: Shoot in a film noir setting

Film Noir, or black film, is a type of film that can easily be attributed to classics such as the Humphery Boggart films of old (Maltese Falcon, King of the Underworld, ect.). If you're looking on how to create the effect yourself without a big budget, check out this video! John Hess gives you some basic tips to creating the effect with lighting and more!

How To: Use an external monitor with a camcorder

In this video from lunawebs we learn how to use an external monitor with a camcorder. The best way is to use an HDTV and use your HDMI output on the TV. The sound can also come through the monitor if you have a headphone port on the monitor. If you want to go outdoors, it will be more of a challenge. If you do not have an HDMI out on your camera, there is a component you can use. Composite AV outs are cheaper when it comes to monitors and camcorders. If you have a composite monitor, assign th...

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