How To: See through people's clothes with a video camera

This video tutorial teaches you how to see through clothes using a blank roll of film and any video camera that has night vision. You won't see people completely naked, but you can see undergarments and the "shape" beneath...If your imagination just isn't cutting it anymore, check out this how-to video and start getting a peak at people in a slightly less clothed state.

How To: Make a bicycle camera mount

Shoot an action-packed close up, or film while you're biking around. All you need to do is build a simple bicycle camera mount. You'll need a tripod mount, PVC pipe, pliers, bungee cord, a U bolt and a bike. Watch this video cinematography tutorial and learn how to build a bicycle camera mount.

How To: Frame and compose a shot for film

What makes a good movie good is that it is both aesthetically pleasing and has an interesting point/plot. This video runs you through how to make it visually effective, stressing how you frame and compose a shot. While the Rule of Thirds is forever a great way to make shots interesting, there are other ways you can set up a shot.

How To: Find cheap and cool DIY lighting for your film

Continuing on with budget lighting, we explore using Fluorescent and LED lights, along with using available light, bouncing it with a reflector. These setups will work great for interviews, video casting, vlogging, and the likes. These lights use less power and also generate much less heat then big halogen work lights, and the price can't be beat. We also show the benefits of adjusting white balance on your camera, with lots of before and after shots. If you are shooting independent movies, s...

How To: Use the Milo Motion Control system rig

This gem, an extensive cinematography video tutorial on Motion Control systems by Mark Roberts Motion Control. In some ways this video is an advertisement for the systems they create, but there is a lot of useful knowledge shared that transfers to planning, shooting, and compositing with lesser tools. This instructional video explains what motion control is and the features of the Milo Motion control system rig. A ton of fantastic commercial and music video creative work is shown, with shot b...

How To: Turn a series of timelapse stills into video

Time lapse photography is a great tool for documentary filmmaking or just making a fun record of a construction project in your home. This video explains how to turn a series of still photos taken with your DSLR camera and turn them into an HD time lapse sequence. It's a bit technical for beginners, but the process isn't as complicated as it looks.

How To: Use an external monitor with a camcorder

In this video from lunawebs we learn how to use an external monitor with a camcorder. The best way is to use an HDTV and use your HDMI output on the TV. The sound can also come through the monitor if you have a headphone port on the monitor. If you want to go outdoors, it will be more of a challenge. If you do not have an HDMI out on your camera, there is a component you can use. Composite AV outs are cheaper when it comes to monitors and camcorders. If you have a composite monitor, assign th...

How To: Shoot in a film noir setting

Film Noir, or black film, is a type of film that can easily be attributed to classics such as the Humphery Boggart films of old (Maltese Falcon, King of the Underworld, ect.). If you're looking on how to create the effect yourself without a big budget, check out this video! John Hess gives you some basic tips to creating the effect with lighting and more!

How To: Build a $25 camera crane

The guys at Indy Mogul show you the Camera Crane (turbo mini jib) that ANYONE can afford! Attach it to your tripod and that good looking girl in your English class might mistake you for George Lucas...not sure if that'll help your chances with her, though.

News: Tilt-Shift, Time-Lapse Video from Camera Phone Transforms the Real World into a Mini Toyland

This colorful image may look like a miniature set of model cars, foam buildings and painted grass, but it's nothing of the sort. It's a still photo from a time-lapse video that Stu Kennedy shot in his hometown of Lincoln, England. But it's not your ordinary time-lapse. Kennedy used his trusty new Samsung Galaxy S2 and its 8-megapixel camera to capture the video in high-definition (1080p). And that's not all. He also used a post-editing technique called tilt-shift, which transforms the normal ...

How To: Make movie rain without getting wet

In this tutorial, we learn how to make movie rain without getting wet. First, you will need to get a garden hose that has a spout on it and few pieces of PVC pipe. Connect the pieces of PVC pipe together, then stick the head of the hose to the pipe. Keep in mind that you will want to cut the pipe a bit shorter so it's easier to hold. Now, have someone hold up the pipe while you are taping and make sure to stay opposite of the way the wind is blowing. After this, you will have taped rain in a ...

How To: Film skateboarding

In this video, we learn how to film skateboarding. First, get a camera that fits your price range and you will be ready to start filming. Next, use a long lens so you capture the best shots of people on their boards and in motion. Next, make sure you capture the lines that the skateboarder is skating on. Use different angles to get the best shot possible. You want to get close to the action, so you will need a fish eye lens. Use your skateboard to follow the skater around. Using these simple ...

How To: Make a cheap DIY camera slider for your film

Film and television cinematographers love sliding camera shots, especially since ER made them a standard device for television dramas. A professional sliding camera setup is expensive though. Why not make one yourself? This video will show you how to turn $20 into a high-quality filmmaking tool that you can use to give your films some very professional-looking shots. Now get out there and follow that gurney with the camera!

Hack Ikea: $15 Camera Dolly

Ikea Hacker features a nice Ikea mod: Romain turns the Ivar side unit into a camera dolly. "A few days ago, I found out that the Ivar 'wooden ladder' was perfect to use it as rails for my cinema dolly! I can now make some nice sequence shots with this 18€ accessory from Ikea."

How To: Set up the Merlin Steadicam

This video walks you through the set up of the Merlin Steadicam rig. For some reason a lot of the video is presented speeded up, but if you can keep up with it, this is useful info. It's not so fast that you can't follow it, but if you're trying to take notes, be prepared to hit "pause" a lot!

How To: Use Merlin positions for smooth steadicam shots

There are a lot of famous steadicam shots where the camera floats just ahead of the actors as they walk along having a conversation. (See just about any episode of "The West Wing" or "Battlestar Galactica.") Perhaps you imagined the cameraman walking backwards, carefully stepping over door frames or other obstacles in order to get this tricky shot. But as you'll see in this video, it's actually a much simpler matter of using a device called a Steadicam Merlin, so the operator can see where he...

How To: Load the Arriflex SRII magazine

Check out this instructional cinematography video to learn how to load 16mm film into the Arriflex SRII magazine. Professor Plow demonstrates the process of loading the Arri SR2 mag. To start loading the feed side, it needs to be done entirely in the changing bag, in a light tight environment. This cinematography tutorial video is ideal for serious film enthusiasts and professionals alike.

How To: Make your own steadicam

Steadicams are mounts used in film making that helps the cameraman capture smooth shots independent of his body's movements. Unfortunately, this equipment can be very costly. Take a look at this instructional video and learn how to make your own steadicam for approximately 9.50 pounds.

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