Hot Cinematography Posts

How To: Make a bicycle camera mount

Shoot an action-packed close up, or film while you're biking around. All you need to do is build a simple bicycle camera mount. You'll need a tripod mount, PVC pipe, pliers, bungee cord, a U bolt and a bike. Watch this video cinematography tutorial and learn how to build a bicycle camera mount.

How To: Make movie rain without getting wet

In this tutorial, we learn how to make movie rain without getting wet. First, you will need to get a garden hose that has a spout on it and few pieces of PVC pipe. Connect the pieces of PVC pipe together, then stick the head of the hose to the pipe. Keep in mind that you will want to cut the pipe a bit shorter so it's easier to hold. Now, have someone hold up the pipe while you are taping and make sure to stay opposite of the way the wind is blowing. After this, you will have taped rain in a ...

How To: Build a $25 camera crane

The guys at Indy Mogul show you the Camera Crane (turbo mini jib) that ANYONE can afford! Attach it to your tripod and that good looking girl in your English class might mistake you for George Lucas...not sure if that'll help your chances with her, though.

News: Tilt-Shift, Time-Lapse Video from Camera Phone Transforms the Real World into a Mini Toyland

This colorful image may look like a miniature set of model cars, foam buildings and painted grass, but it's nothing of the sort. It's a still photo from a time-lapse video that Stu Kennedy shot in his hometown of Lincoln, England. But it's not your ordinary time-lapse. Kennedy used his trusty new Samsung Galaxy S2 and its 8-megapixel camera to capture the video in high-definition (1080p). And that's not all. He also used a post-editing technique called tilt-shift, which transforms the normal ...

How To: Make your own steadicam

Steadicams are mounts used in film making that helps the cameraman capture smooth shots independent of his body's movements. Unfortunately, this equipment can be very costly. Take a look at this instructional video and learn how to make your own steadicam for approximately 9.50 pounds.

How To: Build a guerilla-style camera dolly

MatttChapman shows you how to build a guerilla-style camera dolly to add to your filmmaking bag of tricks. This guerilla dolly is so simple, made with a rain gutter and cover from a local hardware store. This is ingenuity at its best. Don't spend a ton of money for a dolly to simply pan, build this rain gutter dolly!

How To: Make a video camera stabilizer, or fig rig, from PVC

Ben from mechanical mashup shows you how to make a fig rig for a small video camera out of PVC pipe. It gives an ingredient list and tells you the measurements of each piece you must cut. He recommends dry fitting everything at least once, to be sure everything goes together as it should. He then shows how the camera mounts on the rig. In transition of how-to's is a short scene relating to tools, with a man and a boy arguing over ownership. Then Dave shows how to neatly engrave your tools. He...

How To: Make a cheap Dutch Roll camera effect

Maybe you've never heard of the Dutch Roll camera effect, but you've seen it in movies whenever a character is delirious and the camera starts spinning crazily end over need. In this tutorial you'll learn how to set up a cheap version of the effect with a plain old hand drill. Now you can give your audiences vertigo just like the pros do!

How To: Use multiple camera angles when shooting a movie

Spice up your next movie project with new and interesting camera angles. In this tutorial, learn all about the different options for aiming your camera that you can use to convey new moods or effects. These instructions are easy to follow and are great for first time filmmakers. So, follow along, grab your camera and start shooting!

How To: Install the Nikon mount on a RED ONE camera

Check out this instructional cinematography video to learn how to install the Nikon mount on a professional RED ONE camera. This is not an official method, but simply one way to do it until RED officially releases its own how to video. If you don't have steady hands, you may want to take more precautions into covering the sensor while you work. This video tutorial does an excellent job of guiding you step by step along the way to better utilize your RED ONE camera.

How To: Make a Steadicam flying camera support

Garret Brown's original Steadicam® is an icon that revolutionized filmmaking. Being the first and the best, it naturally and justifiably commands a premium price. It is for this reason that homemade DIY Flying Camera Supports have been around since at least 1977, just one short year after Mr. Brown's invention. With this tradition in mind, learn the two fundamental principles behind the Steadicam and how to build your own Flying Camera Support by watching this video filmmaking tutorial.