Hot Cinematography Posts

How To: Make your own affordable underwater camera rig

Want to film underwater, but can't afford the expensive professional camera rig? This tutorial shows you how you can construct your own functional underwater camera rig for about sixty dollars. You will need: small ankle weights, threaded seal tape, waterproof sealant, Velcro, a rubber washer, a sheet of plexiglass, PVC pieces, metal ring clamps, hot glue and a dremel.

How To: Make movie rain without getting wet

In this tutorial, we learn how to make movie rain without getting wet. First, you will need to get a garden hose that has a spout on it and few pieces of PVC pipe. Connect the pieces of PVC pipe together, then stick the head of the hose to the pipe. Keep in mind that you will want to cut the pipe a bit shorter so it's easier to hold. Now, have someone hold up the pipe while you are taping and make sure to stay opposite of the way the wind is blowing. After this, you will have taped rain in a ...

News: Transport Yourself to THE Most Dangerous Race Track in the World: The Green Hell

Ever heard of Nürburgring? If you're an auto racing enthusiast, you likely have. According to Wikipedia, the racetrack was nicknamed "The Green Hell" by Jackie Stewart (famed Scottish racing driver) and is known as "the toughest, most dangerous and most demanding purpose-built racing circuit in the world". Located in Germany, the older track was first built in the 1920s around the village and medieval castle of Nürburg in the Eifel mountains.

How To: Find cheap and cool DIY lighting for your film

Continuing on with budget lighting, we explore using Fluorescent and LED lights, along with using available light, bouncing it with a reflector. These setups will work great for interviews, video casting, vlogging, and the likes. These lights use less power and also generate much less heat then big halogen work lights, and the price can't be beat. We also show the benefits of adjusting white balance on your camera, with lots of before and after shots. If you are shooting independent movies, s...

How To: Shoot a dolly zoom shot

The dolly zoom shot is also known as the Vertigo Effect in filming. It's that dizzying, slightly unstable camera effect you see in shows like "Glee" and sometimes "The Office." It creates audience confusion, thus forcing them to keep watching in interest.

How To: Film skateboarding

In this video, we learn how to film skateboarding. First, get a camera that fits your price range and you will be ready to start filming. Next, use a long lens so you capture the best shots of people on their boards and in motion. Next, make sure you capture the lines that the skateboarder is skating on. Use different angles to get the best shot possible. You want to get close to the action, so you will need a fish eye lens. Use your skateboard to follow the skater around. Using these simple ...

How To: Shoot Macro Video

The advantage of the camcorder is that sometimes, it can see more than the human eye when put close up to something. This cinematography video should help you make interesting shots as well as get really good extreme close-ups.

How To: Simulate teleportation w/ film effects & camera tricks

In this tutorial, we learn how to simulate teleportation w/ film effects & camera tricks. First, take a shot of your actors moving and doing something active. Then, take a shot of the frame without the actors. After this, go frame by frame masking the actors out of each of the frames. Use radio blur to make them leave the shot, then add in evaporation. From here, you can play the clips of the background on the scene so it looks like the have been sent somewhere else. Smooth out the background...

News: DIY RC Helicopter Rig Captures Amazing Canon 7D/5D Aerial Footage

One of the greatest innovations in the DSLR revolution is not only being able to execute shots you never dreamed possible, but you'll find it's affordable, too. I can't think of a better example than this remote controlled DSLR helicopter rig, designed specifically for the Canon 7D and 5D. Advertised as "high definition, low altitude photography and videography," HeliVideo's founder, Eric Austin combines his experience and love of remote controlled helicopters with his knowledge as a videogra...

How To: Make a video camera stabilizer, or fig rig, from PVC

Ben from mechanical mashup shows you how to make a fig rig for a small video camera out of PVC pipe. It gives an ingredient list and tells you the measurements of each piece you must cut. He recommends dry fitting everything at least once, to be sure everything goes together as it should. He then shows how the camera mounts on the rig. In transition of how-to's is a short scene relating to tools, with a man and a boy arguing over ownership. Then Dave shows how to neatly engrave your tools. He...

How To: Understand basic video tricks

Understand basic video tricks. A great way to prop up your camcorder when you don't have a tripod and you want a low angle shot from the ground is to use a rubber doorstop. It stays put and you can move it up and back to set the shot higher or lower.

How To: Build a guerilla-style camera dolly

MatttChapman shows you how to build a guerilla-style camera dolly to add to your filmmaking bag of tricks. This guerilla dolly is so simple, made with a rain gutter and cover from a local hardware store. This is ingenuity at its best. Don't spend a ton of money for a dolly to simply pan, build this rain gutter dolly!

How To: Properly use a green screen

A green screen lets you add any sort of background to your movie in post-production. Part of a successful green screen shot is properly lighting your set so you can easily add the special effects later. Teach your camera crew these tips for your next film!

How To: Build a cheap camera jib arm

Movies take us places we've never been before, and a big tool that has contributed to that age-old phrase "movie magic" is the camera jib arm. Kind of like a camera extendeder, the jib arm is like a rotating crane that you can place your camera on top of.