Hot Cinematography Posts

How To: Use an external monitor with a camcorder

In this video from lunawebs we learn how to use an external monitor with a camcorder. The best way is to use an HDTV and use your HDMI output on the TV. The sound can also come through the monitor if you have a headphone port on the monitor. If you want to go outdoors, it will be more of a challenge. If you do not have an HDMI out on your camera, there is a component you can use. Composite AV outs are cheaper when it comes to monitors and camcorders. If you have a composite monitor, assign th...

How To: Make a cheap DIY camera slider for your film

Film and television cinematographers love sliding camera shots, especially since ER made them a standard device for television dramas. A professional sliding camera setup is expensive though. Why not make one yourself? This video will show you how to turn $20 into a high-quality filmmaking tool that you can use to give your films some very professional-looking shots. Now get out there and follow that gurney with the camera!

How To: Make your own affordable underwater camera rig

Want to film underwater, but can't afford the expensive professional camera rig? This tutorial shows you how you can construct your own functional underwater camera rig for about sixty dollars. You will need: small ankle weights, threaded seal tape, waterproof sealant, Velcro, a rubber washer, a sheet of plexiglass, PVC pieces, metal ring clamps, hot glue and a dremel.

How To: Build a cheap steady cam rig or fig rig

Steady cam rigs allow you to film really great smooth footage, but they cost about $300. If you're too lazy to make one yourself that is! This video will show you how to make a cheap substitute called a fig rig using $30 dollars worth of materials. Now you can finally push beyond handheld to the world of professional-looking video.

How To: Make a bicycle camera mount

Shoot an action-packed close up, or film while you're biking around. All you need to do is build a simple bicycle camera mount. You'll need a tripod mount, PVC pipe, pliers, bungee cord, a U bolt and a bike. Watch this video cinematography tutorial and learn how to build a bicycle camera mount.

Hack Ikea: $15 Camera Dolly

Ikea Hacker features a nice Ikea mod: Romain turns the Ivar side unit into a camera dolly. "A few days ago, I found out that the Ivar 'wooden ladder' was perfect to use it as rails for my cinema dolly! I can now make some nice sequence shots with this 18€ accessory from Ikea."

How To: Compose a shot with the "rule of thirds"

In this clip, learn how to harness the Rule of Thirds when shooting video. The Rule of Thirds is a concept that consists of splitting a shot into thirds and keeping your subject out of the center of the shot. This adds a more interesting and realistic aspect to your filmmaking and can also be used for things like drawing and still photography.

How To: Film Using DSLR at Low Light

Filming in low light is not easy, its tricky and challenging, but if you know the proper ways to set your DSLR camera even if you have the most ordinary lenses you can still capture great videos with less noise. So here are some settings and samples in Filming with your DSLR in Low light.

Explosive POV: Mini Spy Cam Mounted on Firework

The 4th of July brings out the inner-pyro-hypnotized child in many of us. And while WonderHowTo has plenty of tutorials for using/creating firecrackers , fireworks, and general explosives—for responsible 18+ upstanding citizens only, of course!—some of us prefer to enjoy the fiery goodness from the safety of our computer screens.

How To: Set up a green screen for chroma keying

Think you might like to set up a green screen? It's easy! All you really need is a big green sheet. This video production tutorial presents a complete guide and will see to it that you know everything you need to know start incorporating green (or blue) screen work into your own video productions.

News: Transport Yourself to THE Most Dangerous Race Track in the World: The Green Hell

Ever heard of Nürburgring? If you're an auto racing enthusiast, you likely have. According to Wikipedia, the racetrack was nicknamed "The Green Hell" by Jackie Stewart (famed Scottish racing driver) and is known as "the toughest, most dangerous and most demanding purpose-built racing circuit in the world". Located in Germany, the older track was first built in the 1920s around the village and medieval castle of Nürburg in the Eifel mountains.

How To: Use the JVC DR-DV5000 Direct To Edit

Check out this cinematography tutorial video that demonstrates how to use your professional JVC DR-DV5000 Direct to Edit (DTE). The DR-DV5000 is designed to mount directly to your JVC GY-DV5100 and turn it into a DV-Disk recording solution. It becomes possible to shoot directly to disk or simultaneously to tape and disk. The DTE capture files are a mirror image of what's recorded. Learn everything there is to know about the DR-DV5000 with this instructional cinematography video and start usin...

How To: Use gain and neutral density on a video camera

A common problem when shooting in low-light situations is that even if you open your lens to its lowest f-stop number, you're left with an image that's far too dark. One obvious remedy is to add more light. But what if you don't have more lights available to you? That's where the gain increase switch comes in. This free video cinematographer's guide will show you how to use digital gain settings to amplify available light to get better shots in less-than-ideal environments.

How To: Light for video to get a filmic look

In this video, Tony Reale describes some cinematography tips for video lighting. He focuses mainly on different ways to capture the look of video. The lighting style he's using in this video is a 2-light setup. One light is reflecting off a foam core and is placed at the right side of the room. The second light is acting as background light and is smaller and placed in the back, right corner of the room. This is a very simple setup and, with a cost of $100-$200, it is an inexpensive, effectiv...

How To: Understand depth of field while focusing a camcorder

Depth of Field (DoF) is easy to understand, but it is often extremely poorly explained. It's all about selective focus. For consumers with conveniently small camcorders, you only have two options: get your subject away from the background and then (1) zoom in or (2) get the subject close to the camera. No 35mm lens adapters, no secret techniques, no complex math: That's it!