Hot Cinematography Posts

How To: Use a Steadicam Pilot

In this humorously presented video tutorial, you'll learn how to operate the Steadicam Pilot. When you know what you're doing, the Steadicam can give you incredible, pro-quality shots. The Pilot makes the rig even more flexible, and it's surprisingly simple to use.

How To: Build a $25 camera crane

The guys at Indy Mogul show you the Camera Crane (turbo mini jib) that ANYONE can afford! Attach it to your tripod and that good looking girl in your English class might mistake you for George Lucas...not sure if that'll help your chances with her, though.

How To: Use camera stabilization equipment

In this episode, we dive into the expensive, or, at the least, tedious realm of camera stabilization equipment. This ranges from the all-powerful, all-knowing fluid tripod head, to the much used and often abused dolly. We don't own and operate an actual Steadicam or a jib or a crane, but hey, we'll mention them, too.

How To: Shoot low angle moving shots from ground level with a video camera

Low angle shots are a great way to evoke a sense of panic in movies, but if you're trying to get good quality shots from ground level with just your hands, then it's not going to work. The video footage will be all shaky, unless that's another look you're wanting to achieve in your film. If you want steady, fast-tracking low angle footage, then Ritwika has a great trick on taking those ground level moving camera shots. You'll need a monopod, water bottle (with water), 2 rubber bands and your ...

How To: Make a cheap DIY camera slider for your film

Film and television cinematographers love sliding camera shots, especially since ER made them a standard device for television dramas. A professional sliding camera setup is expensive though. Why not make one yourself? This video will show you how to turn $20 into a high-quality filmmaking tool that you can use to give your films some very professional-looking shots. Now get out there and follow that gurney with the camera!

News: Tilt-Shift, Time-Lapse Video from Camera Phone Transforms the Real World into a Mini Toyland

This colorful image may look like a miniature set of model cars, foam buildings and painted grass, but it's nothing of the sort. It's a still photo from a time-lapse video that Stu Kennedy shot in his hometown of Lincoln, England. But it's not your ordinary time-lapse. Kennedy used his trusty new Samsung Galaxy S2 and its 8-megapixel camera to capture the video in high-definition (1080p). And that's not all. He also used a post-editing technique called tilt-shift, which transforms the normal ...

How To: Operate a steadicam

A steadicam can mean the difference between a professional and steady wide shot of Victorian era London or a wobbly, user-generated content-esque portrayal of some old lamps and streets. Having control over how your camera moves is so vital to good film production.

How To: Use an external monitor with a camcorder

In this video from lunawebs we learn how to use an external monitor with a camcorder. The best way is to use an HDTV and use your HDMI output on the TV. The sound can also come through the monitor if you have a headphone port on the monitor. If you want to go outdoors, it will be more of a challenge. If you do not have an HDMI out on your camera, there is a component you can use. Composite AV outs are cheaper when it comes to monitors and camcorders. If you have a composite monitor, assign th...

How To: Make a bicycle camera mount

Shoot an action-packed close up, or film while you're biking around. All you need to do is build a simple bicycle camera mount. You'll need a tripod mount, PVC pipe, pliers, bungee cord, a U bolt and a bike. Watch this video cinematography tutorial and learn how to build a bicycle camera mount.

How To: Make a cheap Dutch Roll camera effect

Maybe you've never heard of the Dutch Roll camera effect, but you've seen it in movies whenever a character is delirious and the camera starts spinning crazily end over need. In this tutorial you'll learn how to set up a cheap version of the effect with a plain old hand drill. Now you can give your audiences vertigo just like the pros do!

How To: Build a cheap steady cam rig or fig rig

Steady cam rigs allow you to film really great smooth footage, but they cost about $300. If you're too lazy to make one yourself that is! This video will show you how to make a cheap substitute called a fig rig using $30 dollars worth of materials. Now you can finally push beyond handheld to the world of professional-looking video.

How To: Use multiple camera angles when shooting a movie

Spice up your next movie project with new and interesting camera angles. In this tutorial, learn all about the different options for aiming your camera that you can use to convey new moods or effects. These instructions are easy to follow and are great for first time filmmakers. So, follow along, grab your camera and start shooting!

How To: Shoot Macro Video

The advantage of the camcorder is that sometimes, it can see more than the human eye when put close up to something. This cinematography video should help you make interesting shots as well as get really good extreme close-ups.

How To: Modify a Glidecam with a Steadicam arm and vest

The lady shows how to make the steadicam arm to work with glidecam stabilizer. The steadicam arm is made such as only a steadicam can be fitted on that. The video describes how to make the usable for glidecam with three simple tools ,a 10 ounce hammer ,a long nose player and a flathead screwdriver. First take out the circular clip with which the post is secured with the screwdriver unscrew and pull the post out .Using the hammer straighten the post .The post will have a scratch but the straig...

How To: Change lenses on a camcorder

Make sure you have the appropriate lens for your digital camera. Look for markers on the lens that correspond with any mark on the camera body. Different brands have different markers. Some have square dots while some have red dots. Line these marks In one hand, hold your camera body firmly pointing to you. While holding it, push the lens button. Firmly hold the bottom of the lens (where the lens meets the camera body), and twist. Some cameras let you twist clockwise, others counterclockwise....

News: DIY RC Helicopter Rig Captures Amazing Canon 7D/5D Aerial Footage

One of the greatest innovations in the DSLR revolution is not only being able to execute shots you never dreamed possible, but you'll find it's affordable, too. I can't think of a better example than this remote controlled DSLR helicopter rig, designed specifically for the Canon 7D and 5D. Advertised as "high definition, low altitude photography and videography," HeliVideo's founder, Eric Austin combines his experience and love of remote controlled helicopters with his knowledge as a videogra...

How To: Understand basic video tricks

Understand basic video tricks. A great way to prop up your camcorder when you don't have a tripod and you want a low angle shot from the ground is to use a rubber doorstop. It stays put and you can move it up and back to set the shot higher or lower.

How To: Shoot in a film noir setting

Film Noir, or black film, is a type of film that can easily be attributed to classics such as the Humphery Boggart films of old (Maltese Falcon, King of the Underworld, ect.). If you're looking on how to create the effect yourself without a big budget, check out this video! John Hess gives you some basic tips to creating the effect with lighting and more!