Hot Cinematography Posts

News: DIY RC Helicopter Rig Captures Amazing Canon 7D/5D Aerial Footage

One of the greatest innovations in the DSLR revolution is not only being able to execute shots you never dreamed possible, but you'll find it's affordable, too. I can't think of a better example than this remote controlled DSLR helicopter rig, designed specifically for the Canon 7D and 5D. Advertised as "high definition, low altitude photography and videography," HeliVideo's founder, Eric Austin combines his experience and love of remote controlled helicopters with his knowledge as a videogra...

How To: Make your own steadicam

Steadicams are mounts used in film making that helps the cameraman capture smooth shots independent of his body's movements. Unfortunately, this equipment can be very costly. Take a look at this instructional video and learn how to make your own steadicam for approximately 9.50 pounds.

Hack Ikea: $15 Camera Dolly

Ikea Hacker features a nice Ikea mod: Romain turns the Ivar side unit into a camera dolly. "A few days ago, I found out that the Ivar 'wooden ladder' was perfect to use it as rails for my cinema dolly! I can now make some nice sequence shots with this 18€ accessory from Ikea."

How To: Build a guerilla-style camera dolly

MatttChapman shows you how to build a guerilla-style camera dolly to add to your filmmaking bag of tricks. This guerilla dolly is so simple, made with a rain gutter and cover from a local hardware store. This is ingenuity at its best. Don't spend a ton of money for a dolly to simply pan, build this rain gutter dolly!

How To: Focus video image using blur

You can use a Gaussian Blur in a number of ways, but Israel Hyman's purpose in this video podcast is simply to expose you to some new possibilities. It’s a brief Izzy Video because he's just throwing out some ideas. In the future, he’ll show how to create the effect.

How To: Build a DIY wooden camera dolly with PVC railing system

If you need a dolly for your movie masterpiece, you don't need to go with a professional dolly system. You can save that money for your expensive actors and actresses by building your own DIY camera dolly on the cheap. You'll need some nuts and bolts, PVC pipes, scrap wood, drill bits and a drill, inline wheels and a hammer. This homemade camera dolly will cost you around 65 bucks.

How To: Operate a steadicam

A steadicam can mean the difference between a professional and steady wide shot of Victorian era London or a wobbly, user-generated content-esque portrayal of some old lamps and streets. Having control over how your camera moves is so vital to good film production.

Explosive POV: Mini Spy Cam Mounted on Firework

The 4th of July brings out the inner-pyro-hypnotized child in many of us. And while WonderHowTo has plenty of tutorials for using/creating firecrackers , fireworks, and general explosives—for responsible 18+ upstanding citizens only, of course!—some of us prefer to enjoy the fiery goodness from the safety of our computer screens.

How To: Shoot in a film noir setting

Film Noir, or black film, is a type of film that can easily be attributed to classics such as the Humphery Boggart films of old (Maltese Falcon, King of the Underworld, ect.). If you're looking on how to create the effect yourself without a big budget, check out this video! John Hess gives you some basic tips to creating the effect with lighting and more!

How To: Make a bicycle camera mount

Shoot an action-packed close up, or film while you're biking around. All you need to do is build a simple bicycle camera mount. You'll need a tripod mount, PVC pipe, pliers, bungee cord, a U bolt and a bike. Watch this video cinematography tutorial and learn how to build a bicycle camera mount.

How To: Shoot a dolly zoom shot

The dolly zoom shot is also known as the Vertigo Effect in filming. It's that dizzying, slightly unstable camera effect you see in shows like "Glee" and sometimes "The Office." It creates audience confusion, thus forcing them to keep watching in interest.

How To: Modify a Glidecam with a Steadicam arm and vest

The lady shows how to make the steadicam arm to work with glidecam stabilizer. The steadicam arm is made such as only a steadicam can be fitted on that. The video describes how to make the usable for glidecam with three simple tools ,a 10 ounce hammer ,a long nose player and a flathead screwdriver. First take out the circular clip with which the post is secured with the screwdriver unscrew and pull the post out .Using the hammer straighten the post .The post will have a scratch but the straig...

How To: Make a Steadicam flying camera support

Garret Brown's original Steadicam® is an icon that revolutionized filmmaking. Being the first and the best, it naturally and justifiably commands a premium price. It is for this reason that homemade DIY Flying Camera Supports have been around since at least 1977, just one short year after Mr. Brown's invention. With this tradition in mind, learn the two fundamental principles behind the Steadicam and how to build your own Flying Camera Support by watching this video filmmaking tutorial.

How To: Find cheap and cool DIY lighting for your film

Continuing on with budget lighting, we explore using Fluorescent and LED lights, along with using available light, bouncing it with a reflector. These setups will work great for interviews, video casting, vlogging, and the likes. These lights use less power and also generate much less heat then big halogen work lights, and the price can't be beat. We also show the benefits of adjusting white balance on your camera, with lots of before and after shots. If you are shooting independent movies, s...

How To: Build a cheap steady cam rig or fig rig

Steady cam rigs allow you to film really great smooth footage, but they cost about $300. If you're too lazy to make one yourself that is! This video will show you how to make a cheap substitute called a fig rig using $30 dollars worth of materials. Now you can finally push beyond handheld to the world of professional-looking video.