Hot Cinematography How-Tos

How To: See through people's clothes with a video camera

This video tutorial teaches you how to see through clothes using a blank roll of film and any video camera that has night vision. You won't see people completely naked, but you can see undergarments and the "shape" beneath...If your imagination just isn't cutting it anymore, check out this how-to video and start getting a peak at people in a slightly less clothed state.

How To: Frame and compose a shot for film

What makes a good movie good is that it is both aesthetically pleasing and has an interesting point/plot. This video runs you through how to make it visually effective, stressing how you frame and compose a shot. While the Rule of Thirds is forever a great way to make shots interesting, there are other ways you can set up a shot.

How To: Use an external monitor with a camcorder

In this video from lunawebs we learn how to use an external monitor with a camcorder. The best way is to use an HDTV and use your HDMI output on the TV. The sound can also come through the monitor if you have a headphone port on the monitor. If you want to go outdoors, it will be more of a challenge. If you do not have an HDMI out on your camera, there is a component you can use. Composite AV outs are cheaper when it comes to monitors and camcorders. If you have a composite monitor, assign th...

How To: Shoot sunrise or sunsets on video

It's very hard to capture a sunrise on camera. Yes, you can get a general feeling from a single shot: the hazy, blue-orange rays of light peeking through the clouds in a sunrise or the crimson red streaks of sun dappling darkening skies in a sunset. But to truly capture a sunset or a sunrise, you have to experience them.

How To: Export your stop motion films with iKITMovie

iKITMovie is stop motion animation software for PC's running Windows XP or Vista. All you need is a computer and a USB webcam or USB streaming camcorder and you are ready to make your own brickfilms or clay animation (claymation) movies. If you wish, you can simply import your JPG images (640x480) that you have already taken with your camcorder or digital still camera for simple editing.

How To: Shoot low angle moving shots from ground level with a video camera

Low angle shots are a great way to evoke a sense of panic in movies, but if you're trying to get good quality shots from ground level with just your hands, then it's not going to work. The video footage will be all shaky, unless that's another look you're wanting to achieve in your film. If you want steady, fast-tracking low angle footage, then Ritwika has a great trick on taking those ground level moving camera shots. You'll need a monopod, water bottle (with water), 2 rubber bands and your ...

How To: Set up and light a blue/green screen for filming

You will see a great way to light and set up a blue/green screen for your next video. There are a lot of tips that will come in handy if you want to film on a blue/green screen and don't want to pay outrageous fees to do so. The key in setting up is to block out all outside sources of light so you have just the desired amount of lighting coming just from your own sources and also setting up the screen and stretching it out as tight as possible so you won't see any creases or snags in the mate...

How To: Use a Steadicam Pilot

In this humorously presented video tutorial, you'll learn how to operate the Steadicam Pilot. When you know what you're doing, the Steadicam can give you incredible, pro-quality shots. The Pilot makes the rig even more flexible, and it's surprisingly simple to use.

How To: Use the JVC GY-DV5100U professional camcorder

Check out this cinematography tutorial video that demonstrates how to use the GY-DV5100U Professional DV Camcorder. JVC has upgraded the camera's features and digital processing circuits to meet the requirements of a growing number of broadcasters looking for cost effective alternatives to the over-priced tapeless solutions of other manufacturers. This video is great for cinematographers and filmmaking aficionados alike. Learn all the functions and settings on the GY-DV5100U with this instruc...

How To: Make your own steadicam

Steadicams are mounts used in film making that helps the cameraman capture smooth shots independent of his body's movements. Unfortunately, this equipment can be very costly. Take a look at this instructional video and learn how to make your own steadicam for approximately 9.50 pounds.

How To: Build your own ten foot long camera dolly track

Need some smooth pan shots for your indie film? How about a cool dolly zoom effect? Well, you don't need to be a professional filmmaker to use such a device, but you do need the money for the gear. But—if you can work your way around the workshop, you can probably build your own camera dolly and track just fine. And for under $100! This video shows you how to build your own DIY dolly and dolly track, and all you need are the parts listed below. Then you just need to learn the art of the dolly...

How To: Get Great Bokeh for Videos and Photos Using Christmas Lights

So what is Bokeh? Well, the word comes from the Japanese term "boke" (bo-keh) which means fuzziness. Bokeh describes the character of the blur in an image, but is often used specifically to refer to points of light rendered as fuzzy circles. These "circles of confusion" come from points of light not being perfectly focused. You know when you're taking a picture of your friend at night, and the lights in the background go fuzzy? That's it! Having a beautifully blurred background can help focus...

How To: Film Using DSLR at Low Light

Filming in low light is not easy, its tricky and challenging, but if you know the proper ways to set your DSLR camera even if you have the most ordinary lenses you can still capture great videos with less noise. So here are some settings and samples in Filming with your DSLR in Low light.

How To: Shoot like a pro as a newcomer to digital video

Learn the basics of shooting videos in this video. This funny and informative video from Vimeo's excellent Video 101 series of tutorials demonstrates the importance of things like always carrying extra batteries, holding on to the subject for at least 5 seconds, using the rule of thirds to compose the shots, and planning the shots ahead of time.

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